libreplanet-discuss
[Top][All Lists]
Advanced

[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [libreplanet-discuss] Free Software CD for Windows?


From: Gustavo C. M.
Subject: Re: [libreplanet-discuss] Free Software CD for Windows?
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:47:14 -0200

Just refining a conception: if the "dumb terminal" is not a computer
communicating with the main computer through a network protocol -- let's
say, what happens being only the assignment of I/O devices to certain
user account --, that will not be a network.

Em Seg, 2012-12-03 às 15:43 -0200, Gustavo C. M. escreveu:
> > Thanks for the help Gustavo, I had not read it this way.
> 
> You are welcome.
> 
> > On the other hand, I wonder why "Network Interaction" (as covered by
> > the GNU AGPL) is not considered "making available the public"...
> > 
> > Is there a legal difference if the owner put the computers in the back
> > of the cafe and had dumb terminals for the customers to connect
> > through a network?
> 
> I am not a lawyer (I don't even know the law), but it seems to me that
> the owner of the coffee house, in the case you pointed out, keeps owning
> the equipment in comparison with the former configuration: he owns the
> whole network (the server, the connection and the clients -- I don't
> know if a terminal's dumbness would interfere with its qualification as
> a "client", and so with the "network" status of the whole thing), being
> that his instrument of propagation of covered works (his customers, the
> public, are using his equipment), while in (most?) cases of "Network
> **Interaction**" none of the parties own the whole network: the client
> computer is owned by the "consumer", the network is owned mostly by
> third parties and the server is owned by the provider.
> 
> In the second case, the data for computation in the server comes from a
> computer owned by the "customer" (let's say it's a "delegation" of
> computing); in the first one, it already comes from the providers' one
> (let's say the computing is already delegated by the very system's
> structure) -- remembering that, so, the services provided in both cases
> are not the same.
> 
> Em Dom, 2012-12-02 às 16:38 -0700, Patrick Anderson escreveu:
> > >         Propagation includes
> > >         copying, distribution (with or without modification), **making
> > >         available to the public**, and in some countries other
> > >         activities as well.
> > 
> > Thanks for the help Gustavo, I had not read it this way.
> > 
> > On the other hand, I wonder why "Network Interaction" (as covered by
> > the GNU AGPL) is not considered "making available the public"...
> > 
> > Is there a legal difference if the owner put the computers in the back
> > of the cafe and had dumb terminals for the customers to connect
> > through a network?
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > On Sun, Dec 2, 2012 at 1:38 PM, Gustavo C. M. <address@hidden> wrote:
> > > Just an exercise of making distinctions:
> > >
> > >> For example, the owner of an "Internet Cafe" could offer the use of
> > >> Free Software on machines that the users do not own.
> > >> Since the software is not being distributed, the GNU GPL does not come
> > >> into effect.
> > >
> > > It comes; it's just that it's "propagation", not "conveying", of a
> > > "covered work".
> > >
> > > Let's have some GPL (*'s added) https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html :
> > >
> > >         "TERMS AND CONDITIONS
> > >         0. Definitions.
> > >         [...]
> > >         “The Program” refers to any copyrightable work licensed under
> > >         this License. [...]
> > >         A “covered work” means either the unmodified Program or a work
> > >         based on the Program.
> > >         To “propagate” a work means to do anything with it that, without
> > >         permission, would make you directly or secondarily liable for
> > >         infringement under applicable copyright law, except executing it
> > >         on a computer or modifying a private copy. Propagation includes
> > >         copying, distribution (with or without modification), **making
> > >         available to the public**, and in some countries other
> > >         activities as well.
> > >         To “convey” a work means any kind of propagation that enables
> > >         other parties to make or receive copies. Mere interaction with a
> > >         user through a computer network, with no transfer of a copy, is
> > >         not conveying.
> > >         [...]
> > >         2. Basic Permissions.
> > >         [...]
> > >         You may make, run and propagate covered works that you do not
> > >         convey, without conditions so long as your license otherwise
> > >         remains in force. You may convey covered works to others for the
> > >         sole purpose of having them make modifications exclusively for
> > >         you, or provide you with facilities for running those works,
> > >         provided that you comply with the terms of this License in
> > >         conveying all material for which you do not control copyright

reply via email to

[Prev in Thread] Current Thread [Next in Thread]