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[taler-docs] branch master updated: Ended with editing the sub chapter '


From: gnunet
Subject: [taler-docs] branch master updated: Ended with editing the sub chapter 'Fee level in case of misuse', minor edits of terms to use
Date: Sun, 17 Jan 2021 12:08:39 +0100

This is an automated email from the git hooks/post-receive script.

skuegel pushed a commit to branch master
in repository docs.

The following commit(s) were added to refs/heads/master by this push:
     new 7e16b5a  Ended with editing the sub chapter 'Fee level in case of 
misuse', minor edits of terms to use
7e16b5a is described below

commit 7e16b5a2ac61a8263ff5edebe20e8d9302cfeae3
Author: Stefan K├╝gel <skuegel@web.de>
AuthorDate: Sun Jan 17 12:07:20 2021 +0100

    Ended with editing the sub chapter 'Fee level in case of misuse', minor 
edits of terms to use
---
 design-documents/012-fee-schedule-metrics.rst | 12 ++++++------
 1 file changed, 6 insertions(+), 6 deletions(-)

diff --git a/design-documents/012-fee-schedule-metrics.rst 
b/design-documents/012-fee-schedule-metrics.rst
index 3d34a4c..7e43fe6 100644
--- a/design-documents/012-fee-schedule-metrics.rst
+++ b/design-documents/012-fee-schedule-metrics.rst
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ This chapter discusses considerations for fees from different 
points of view (Ex
 Motivation
 ==========
   
-Fees are necessary for covering costs that Exchange operators bear for 
offering their services established in-house or outsourced in a data center: 
Variable costs (e.g. electricity and wire fees for every wired transfer to bank 
accounts) and fixed-cost expenditures for hardware, company assets, marketing 
and staff, and so forth. They will allocate these costs to customers. The Taler 
protocol therefore offers different types of fees for each type of transaction 
that may appear in the tran [...]
+Fees are necessary for covering costs that Exchange operators bear for 
offering their services established in-house or outsourced in a data center: 
Variable costs (e.g. electricity and wire fees for every wired transfer to bank 
accounts) and fixed-cost expenditures for hardware, company assets, marketing 
and staff, and so forth. They will allocate these costs to users. The Taler 
protocol therefore offers different types of fees for each type of transaction 
that may appear in the transact [...]
 
 Any coin that has been generated or that is used (deposited) or refreshed can 
be charged with an applicable fee type. In addition to this, every wired amount 
of money can be charged with a wire fee. The six fee types are named as 
**Withdrawal**, **Deposit**, **Refresh**, **Refund**, **Wire fee** and 
**Closing**. The fee type 'Closing' is used for allocating costs that arise 
from an uncompleted withdrawal transaction when an amount of fiat money has to 
be wired back from the Exchange's es [...]
 
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ Obligations of Exchange operators
 
 Exchange operators have to adhere to the fee schedule. Otherwise they can lose 
their interface access, have their certification revoked and, moreover, even 
become liable for damages. For each transaction type there is one specific fee 
type. Exchange operators set the fee amount. If a fee type is set to a value of 
0, this fee type will not contribute to the operator's income from fees.
 
-Two fee types ('Wire fee', 'Closing') and the 'Recoup' protocol will cause 
costs for Exchange operators due to wire transfers to accounts wired by banks. 
Therefore, operators must find suitable ways to have these costs covered by 
customers.
+Two fee types ('Wire fee', 'Closing') and the 'Recoup' protocol will cause 
costs for Exchange operators due to wire transfers to accounts wired by banks. 
Therefore, operators must find suitable ways to have these costs covered by 
users.
 
 The 'Recoup' protocol does not allow Exchange operators to set any fee amount, 
because reimbursing funds from an Exchange that is about to cease its activity 
must always be at zero cost for the user. Wiring fees in the case of 'Recoup' 
have to be entirely covered by Exchange operators instead.
 
@@ -109,11 +109,11 @@ While withdrawal fees do not burden sellers, withdrawal 
fees are imposing a thre
 
 * **Deposit** from the buyer's point of view:
 
-Customers give a merchant the right to deposit coins in return for 
merchandise, and sellers trigger the deposit request. It is always the seller 
who has to bear the deposit fee per coin - but only up to a maximum value 
determined by the seller (using the variable ``default_max_deposit_fee``). The 
remainder of the deposit fee exceeding this maximum value has to be paid by the 
respective buyer. Deposit fees could theoretically be used to distribute all 
costs that Exchange operators have to [...]
+Customers give a merchant the right to deposit coins in return for 
merchandise, and sellers trigger the deposit request. It is always the seller 
who has to bear the deposit fee per coin - but only up to a maximum value 
determined by the seller (using the variable ``default_max_deposit_fee``). The 
remainder of the deposit fee exceeding this maximum value has to be paid by the 
respective buyer. Deposit fees could theoretically be used to distribute all 
costs that Exchange operators have to [...]
 
 * **Deposit** from the Exchange operator's point of view:
 
-During deposit, the Exchange logic compares the public key of each coin with 
the keys stored in an array in the Exchange's Postgres database and examines 
each coin to determine whether it is redeemed for payment for the first time. 
This process consumes little energy and adds no additional cost. For Exchange 
operators, this marginally small cost factor can only become significant when 
there is a very high amount of deposit transactions to encounter (e.g. at large 
web-shops). Deposit fees [...]
+During deposit transactions, the Exchange logic compares the public key of 
each coin with the keys stored in an array in the exchange's Postgres database 
and examines each coin to determine whether it is redeemed for payment for the 
first time. This process consumes little energy and adds no additional cost. 
For Exchange operators, this marginally small cost factor can only become 
significant when there is a very high amount of deposit transactions to 
encounter (e.g. at large web-shops). [...]
 
 * **Deposit** from the seller's point of view:
 
@@ -144,7 +144,7 @@ In contrast to the 'Refresh' fee type, the sellers -- and 
not the buyers -- trig
 
 * **Refund** from the Exchange operator's point of view:
 
-Exchange operators cannot suppress refund postings because they must allow 
sellers to discount and cancel purchase contracts. A partial refund only 
partially relieves buyers of their deposit fees. Over time, customers are more 
likely to avoid such sellers who often have to discount after a contract is 
signed. Sellers who repeatedly trigger complete refunds, while exempting 
buyers' coins already deposited with the exchange from deposit fees, burden 
them with 'Refresh' fees. Should an Exch [...]
+Exchange operators cannot suppress refund postings because they must allow 
sellers to discount and cancel purchase contracts. A partial refund only 
partially relieves buyers of their deposit fees. Over time, customers are more 
likely to avoid such sellers who often have to discount after a contract is 
signed. Sellers who repeatedly trigger complete refunds, while exempting 
buyers' coins already deposited with the exchange from deposit fees, burden 
them with 'Refresh' fees. Should an Exch [...]
 
 * **Refund** from the seller's point of view:
 
@@ -193,7 +193,7 @@ Exchange operators must in some cases be able to take 
action by using different
 
 * Abuse due to ``refund transactions`` occurs when sellers trigger the refund 
transaction arbitrarily too often. This can be limited by introducing or 
increasing the fee type **Refund**. As a consequence, the Exchange operator 
charges sellers for every refund they grant for coins that were signed by the 
exchange.
 
-* Abuse due to ``wire transfers`` will only affect an Exchange operator when 
sellers increase the frequency of aggregated wire transfers from his exchange 
to their banking accounts. This will the case for extremely often actuated wire 
transfers. A good reason for this may be a seller's urgent need for liquidity 
from sales revenues. Some merchants might also generate profits from interest 
rates, if they receive sales revenues some time before they have to pay for 
their merchandise already [...]
+* Abuse due to ``wire transfers`` will only affect an Exchange operator when 
sellers increase the frequency of aggregated wire transfers from his exchange 
to their banking accounts. A reason for frequently actuated wire transfers may 
be a seller's urgent need for immediate liquidity from sales revenues. Some 
merchants might also want to generate profit from interest rates for their 
sales revenues before they pay for their merchandise already sold. In any of 
these cases, IBAN wire transfe [...]
 
 * Abuse due to ``closing transactions`` and the accompanying wire transfer of 
remittances back to the originating accounts burdens the Exchange operator with 
costs for wire transfers; to prevent this, the Exchange operator can introduce 
or increase the fee type **Closing**.
 

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