discuss-gnustep
[Top][All Lists]
Advanced

[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: Programming it's a play


From: Dennis Leeuw
Subject: Re: Programming it's a play
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2003 18:59:54 +0200
User-agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.0.0) Gecko/20020623 Debian/1.0.0-0.woody.1

Thanks. I hoped it worked. And I think your points are valid once. I updated myVersion. I also incorporated methods in the text. I changed the third paragraph to:

<para>Assume a girl taking a course at our school. We will educate her the methods of an actress, which equals to programming a class (we write the methods). When she finishes our school she is an actress. Her exam is our compiling stage.</para>

Dennis

Edward Dore wrote:
This is my first post in this group so I don't no whether you object to top posting/replying, if you do then I apologise. Dennis, a brillinat description, you should send it to Sun, I have recently been starting to learn Java, my first properly object orientated language (Visual Basic doesn't count) and their explenation is useless and incredably confusing, as is the one in my C++ book. It took me ages to figure their examples out but I got your straight away. I would only mkae two changes;

   1. Switch around the "When the compiling succeeds we have created a
      class object, namely an actor, able to perform any role." and  "As
      long as the compiling is not successful the lessons aren't
      finished." sentences, I just think it will read better that way.
   2. I'm not sure bout this one but consider either rewording some of
      the sentences to make them gender independent (replacing "she"
      with "they") or mentioning the actor being female earlier (but
      still leave "Our actress of course is also female, so her root
      class is females. And she inherits from her female root class all
      methods that make her female." to the end and remember to add the
      space in between "of" and "course" that I've put in the reply)

I hope this helps and I havn't completly wreck a decent article :)
Edward Dore

Dennis Leeuw wrote:

Hi all,

I picked up working at the Objective-C programming guide. The last couple of weeks I have been working on the Guide and have been reading a lot of documentation. The more I read the less happy I was with the Wheel example off the current Guide for Classes and Objects.

So I need an new idea. The following is what I came up with to explain the OO programing terms. I would like people to review the following text to see if that can be used as an explanation of Objective-C programming.

Sorry for the docbook layout stuff, but I just cut everything from myVersion of the Programming Guide.

Thanks for any input/remarks etc.

<para>If we are a school for actors we have a written definition of what an actor is. From the <ulink url="http://dictionary.cambridge.org/";>The cambridge dictionary</ulink> a description might be: <cite>someone who pretends to be someone else while performing in a film, theatrical performance, or television or radio programme</cite>.</para>

<para>With the above we have defined a class. In this case everyone that fits within the above description is an actor. The oposite is also true, everyone who wants to be an actor has to perform the above definition.</para>

<para>As soon as a person takes a course at our school we will educate her to be come an actor, which equals to our programming a class. When she finishes our lessons she is an actor, this is the compiling. As long as the compiling is not successful the lessons aren't finished. When the compiling succeeds we have created a class object, namely an actor, able to perform any role.</para>

<para>But as the above definition says she will only be a true actor, when she performs, she has to perform in e.g a play. Since every play is different she has to learn a role (get specific, play related, information: instance variables). When she plays the role she has then become our object.</para>

<para>The events happening on stage are the messages on which our actress acts.</para>

<para>Our actress of course is also female, so her root class is females. And she inherits from her female root class all methods that make her female.</para>

Greetings,

Dennis Leeuw



_______________________________________________
Discuss-gnustep mailing list
address@hidden
http://mail.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnustep


------------------------------------------------------------------------

_______________________________________________
Discuss-gnustep mailing list
address@hidden
http://mail.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnustep







reply via email to

[Prev in Thread] Current Thread [Next in Thread]