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Re: finding changes on a branch


From: Dennis Jones
Subject: Re: finding changes on a branch
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 07:13:24 GMT

"Andy Howell" <address@hidden> wrote in message 
news:address@hidden
>I have a branch with subbranch:
>
> 1.66
>  |
>  +-> 1.66.2.1 - main branch
>      ...
>      1.66.2.9
>            |
>            +-> 1.66.2.9.2.1 ( Branch 1.66.2.9.2 ) - sub-branch
>      1.66.2.10
>      1.66.2.11
>
> I need to apply the changes between 1.66.2.9 and 1.66.2.9.2.1 to 
> 1.66.2.11. If I use the revision number, I can get a diff:
>
> cvs diff -r 1.66.2.9 -r 1.66.2.9.2.1 somefile.cpp
>
> cvs stat on somefile.cpp says:
>
> Sticky Tag:  patch1 (branch: 1.66.2.9.2)
>
> If I try:
>
> cvs diff -r patch1 somefile.cpp
> or
> cvs diff -r patch1 -r HEAD somefile.cpp
>
> I don't get and changes.
>
> I can't figure out how to specify the revsions using the branch tags. I'm 
> trying to express "take all the changes on my patch1 branch, and apply 
> them to the head of the main branch".

You are using the wrong command.  'diff' only displays changes between 
revisions; it does not apply them.  You need to use the 'update' command 
with the -j switch.  For example, on your main branch (change to its 
directory), do:

cvs up -j 1.66.2.9 -j 1.66.2.9.2.1 somefile.cpp

This will cause the changes in somefile.cpp between 1.66.2.9 and 
1.66.2.9.2.1 to be applied to somefile.cpp in the current directory (which 
should be your main branch).

If you want to do the same thing for all files in the branch, I hope you 
have a symbolic tag that points to the branch's starting point (a branch tag 
moves as files are modified, so you cannot use a branch tag as its starting 
point).  If you don't have a symbolic tag, then you are going to have a 
difficult time applying all of the changes for all of the files using 
individual revision numbers!  The best thing to do is create a symbolic tag 
using a time stamp (assuming you know when the branch was created).  You can 
do this by using the 'tag' or 'rtag' command with the -D switch.  For 
example:

cvs rtag -D 2007-08-01 15:00:00  branch_start  module_name

Once you have a symbolic tag that references the branch's starting point, 
you can do (from your main branch directory):

cvs up -j branch_start -j branch_tag

This will cause the changes in all files between branch_start (a symbolic 
tag) and branch_tag (a branch tag) to be applied to those same files in the 
current directory (which should be your main branch).

Does this make sense?

- Dennis 




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