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typos in CVS manual


From: Ralf Wildenhues
Subject: typos in CVS manual
Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2006 23:21:45 +0200
User-agent: Mutt/1.5.12-2006-07-14

Hello there,

The following patch against the current CVS checkout fixes some typos in
the manual, fixes some spacings, and en_UK spellings to en_US for
consistency.

Cheers,
Ralf

2006-08-10  Ralf Wildenhues  <address@hidden>

        * doc/cvs.texinfo, doc/cvsclient.texi: Fix some typos.

Index: doc/cvs.texinfo
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/cvs/ccvs/doc/cvs.texinfo,v
retrieving revision 1.694
diff -u -r1.694 cvs.texinfo
--- doc/cvs.texinfo     16 Jul 2006 23:54:01 -0000      1.694
+++ doc/cvs.texinfo     10 Aug 2006 21:03:45 -0000
@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@
 
 Of course, you should place the tools created to
 support such a build system (scripts, @file{Makefile}s,
-etc) under @sc{cvs}.
+etc.) under @sc{cvs}.
 
 Figuring out what files need to be rebuilt when
 something changes is, again, something to be handled
@@ -376,7 +376,7 @@
 files, will logically conflict with one another.  Its
 concept of a @dfn{conflict} is purely textual, arising
 when two changes to the same base file are near enough
-to spook the merge (i.e. @code{diff3}) command.
+to spook the merge (i.e., @code{diff3}) command.
 
 @sc{cvs} does not claim to help at all in figuring out
 non-textual or distributed conflicts in program logic.
@@ -396,7 +396,7 @@
 Change control refers to a number of things.  First of
 all it can mean @dfn{bug-tracking}, that is being able
 to keep a database of reported bugs and the status of
-each one (is it fixed?  in what release?  has the bug
+each one (Is it fixed?  In what release?  Has the bug
 submitter agreed that it is fixed?).  For interfacing
 @sc{cvs} to an external bug-tracking system, see the
 @file{rcsinfo} and @file{verifymsg} files
@@ -2263,7 +2263,7 @@
 @var{method} portion of the repository name.}
 
 These options first appeared in @sc{cvs} version 1.12.7 and are valid as
-modifcations to the @code{gserver} and @code{pserver} connection methods.
+modifications to the @code{gserver} and @code{pserver} connection methods.
 
 @cindex CVS_RSH method option
 @item address@hidden
@@ -2280,7 +2280,7 @@
 @end example
 
 This method option first appeared in @sc{cvs} version 1.12.11 and is valid only
-as a modifcation to the @code{ext} connection method.
+as a modification to the @code{ext} connection method.
 
 @cindex CVS_SERVER method option
 @item address@hidden
@@ -2305,7 +2305,7 @@
 @end example
 
 This method option first appeared in @sc{cvs} version 1.12.11 and is valid
-as a modifcation to both the @code{ext} and @code{fork} connection methods.
+as a modification to both the @code{ext} and @code{fork} connection methods.
 
 @cindex Redirect, method option
 @item address@hidden
@@ -2324,7 +2324,7 @@
 @ref{Write proxies}.
 
 This method option first appeared in @sc{cvs} version 1.12.11 and is valid only
-as a modifcation to the @code{ext} connection method.
+as a modification to the @code{ext} connection method.
 
 @cindex OpenPGP Signatures
 @cindex Commit Signatures
@@ -2794,7 +2794,7 @@
 cvs    session     required    pam_unix.so
 @end example
 
-The the equivalent @file{/etc/pam.d/cvs} would contain
+The equivalent @file{/etc/pam.d/cvs} would contain
 
 @example
 auth       required    pam_unix.so
@@ -3236,14 +3236,14 @@
 to any other CVS server (@pxref{Remote repositories}).
 @item
 Ensuring that @address@hidden is passed to
address@hidden incovations of the secondary server if the path to the @sc{cvs}
address@hidden invocations of the secondary server if the path to the @sc{cvs}
 repository directory is different on the two servers and you wish to support
-clients that do not handle the @samp{Redirect} resopnse (CVS 1.12.9 and earlier
+clients that do not handle the @samp{Redirect} response (CVS 1.12.9 and earlier
 clients do not handle the @samp{Redirect} response).
 
-Please note, again, that writethrough proxy suport requires
+Please note, again, that writethrough proxy support requires
 @address@hidden to be specified for @strong{all}
-incovations of the secondary server, not just @samp{pserver} invocations.
+invocations of the secondary server, not just @samp{pserver} invocations.
 This may require a wrapper script for the @sc{cvs} executable
 on your server machine.
 @end enumerate
@@ -3963,7 +3963,7 @@
 
 When you tag more than one file with the same tag you
 can think about the tag as "a curve drawn through a
-matrix of filename vs. revision number."  Say we have 5
+matrix of filename vs.@: revision number."  Say we have 5
 files with the following revisions:
 
 @example
@@ -6079,7 +6079,7 @@
 locks, have all developers put "edit -c", "commit -c" in their
 .cvsrc file, and turn on watches in the repository.  This
 prevents them from doing a @code{cvs edit} if anyone is
-already editting the file.  It also may
+already editing the file.  It also may
 be possible to use plain watches together with suitable
 procedures (not enforced by software), to avoid having
 two people edit at the same time.
@@ -6740,8 +6740,8 @@
 put "edit -c" and "commit -c" into all .cvsrc files,
 and make files default to read only by turning on watches
 or putting "cvs -r" into all .cvsrc files.
-This prevents multiple people from editting a file at
-the same time (unless explicitly overriden with @samp{-f}).
+This prevents multiple people from editing a file at
+the same time (unless explicitly overridden with @samp{-f}).
 
 @c I'm a little dissatisfied with this presentation,
 @c because "watch on"/"edit"/"editors" are one set of
@@ -6988,9 +6988,9 @@
 There are two additional options that @code{cvs edit} understands as of
 @sc{cvs} client and server versions 1.12.10 but @code{cvs watch} does not.
 The first is @code{-c}, which causes @code{cvs edit} to fail if anyone else
-is editting the file.  This is probably only useful when @samp{edit -c} and
+is editing the file.  This is probably only useful when @samp{edit -c} and
 @samp{commit -c} are specified in all developers' @file{.cvsrc} files.  This
-behavior may be overriden this via the @code{-f} option, which overrides
+behavior may be overridden this via the @code{-f} option, which overrides
 @code{-c} and allows multiple edits to succeed.
 
 @ignore
@@ -9823,7 +9823,7 @@
 Refuse to commit files unless the user has registered a valid edit on the
 file via @code{cvs edit}.  This is most useful when @samp{commit -c}
 and @samp{edit -c} have been placed in all @file{.cvsrc} files.
-A commit can be forced anyways by either regestering an edit retroactively
+A commit can be forced anyways by either registering an edit retroactively
 via @code{cvs edit} (no changes to the file will be lost) or using the
 @code{-f} option to commit.  Support for @code{commit -c} requires both
 client and a server versions 1.12.10 or greater.
@@ -11336,7 +11336,7 @@
 Show dead revisions (with tag when specified).
 
 @item -e
-Display in CVS/Entries format.  This format is meant to remain easily parsable
+Display in CVS/Entries format.  This format is meant to remain easily parseable
 by automation.
 
 @item -l
@@ -12501,7 +12501,7 @@
 @ref{Editing files}.
 
 @item -c
-Check edits: Edit fails if someone else is already editting the file.
+Check edits: Edit fails if someone else is already editing the file.
 Requires a @sc{cvs} client and server both of version 1.12.10 or greater.
 
 @item -f
@@ -13436,7 +13436,7 @@
 @sc{cvs} will execute this program on the server from a temporary
 directory. The path is searched for this program.
 
-If using ``local access'' (on a local or remote NFS file system, i.e.
+If using ``local access'' (on a local or remote NFS file system, i.e.,
 repository set just to a path),
 the program will be executed from the newly checked-out tree, if
 found there, or alternatively searched for in the path if not.
@@ -13964,7 +13964,7 @@
 
 Since the new format separates each individual item and passes it into the
 script as a separate argument (for a good reason - arguments containing commas
-and/or white space are now parsable), to remove the deprecated @samp{1} from
+and/or white space are now parseable), to remove the deprecated @samp{1} from
 your @file{loginfo} command line templates, you will most likely have to
 rewrite any scripts called by the hook to handle the new argument format.
 
@@ -15174,8 +15174,8 @@
 @cindex Log keyword, configuring substitution behavior
 @item address@hidden
 Set to some length, in bytes, where a trailing @samp{k}, @samp{M}, @samp{G},
-or @samp{T} causes the preceding nubmer to be interpreted as kilobytes,
-megabytes, gigabytes, or terrabytes, respectively, will cause
+or @samp{T} causes the preceding number to be interpreted as kilobytes,
+megabytes, gigabytes, or terabytes, respectively, will cause
 @address@hidden keywords (@pxref{Keyword substitution}), with
 more than @var{length} bytes preceding it on a line to be ignored (or to fall
 back on the comment leader set in the RCS archive file - see
@@ -15194,7 +15194,7 @@
 levels accepted by the @samp{-z} option (@pxref{Global options}), and 0 means
 no compression.  When one or both of these keys are set and a client requests a
 level outside the specified range, the server will simply use the closest
-permissable level.  Clients will continue compressing at the level requested by
+permissible level.  Clients will continue compressing at the level requested by
 the user.
 
 The exception is when level 0 (no compression) is not available and the client
@@ -15972,7 +15972,7 @@
 @item cvs [checkout aborted]: no such tag @var{tag}
 This message means that @sc{cvs} isn't familiar with
 the tag @var{tag}.  Usually the root cause is that you have
-mistyped a tag name.  Ocassionally this can also occur because the
+mistyped a tag name.  Occasionally this can also occur because the
 users creating tags do not have permissions to write to the
 @file{CVSROOT/val-tags} file (@pxref{File permissions}, for more).
 
@@ -15982,7 +15982,7 @@
 @c Search sanity.sh for "no such tag" to see some of
 @c the relatively obscure cases.
 try a few other @sc{cvs} commands involving that tag
-until one was found whch caused @sc{cvs} to update
+until one was found which caused @sc{cvs} to update
 @cindex CVSROOT/val-tags file, forcing tags into
 @cindex val-tags file, forcing tags into
 the @file{val-tags} file, at which point the originally failing command
Index: doc/cvsclient.texi
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/cvs/ccvs/doc/cvsclient.texi,v
retrieving revision 1.146
diff -u -r1.146 cvsclient.texi
--- doc/cvsclient.texi  9 Jun 2006 01:18:05 -0000       1.146
+++ doc/cvsclient.texi  10 Aug 2006 21:03:45 -0000
@@ -205,7 +205,7 @@
 @samp{E} and/or @samp{error}.
 
 @item E @var{text}
-Provide a message for the user.  After this reponse, the authentication
+Provide a message for the user.  After this response, the authentication
 protocol continues with another response.  Typically the server will
 provide a series of @samp{E} responses followed by @samp{error}.
 Compatibility note: @sc{cvs} 1.9.10 and older clients will print
@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@
 The procedure here is to start with @samp{BEGIN
 GSSAPI REQUEST}.  GSSAPI authentication information is then exchanged
 between the client and the server.  Each packet of information consists
-of a two byte big endian length, followed by that many bytes of data.
+of a two byte big-endian length, followed by that many bytes of data.
 After the GSSAPI authentication is complete, the server continues with
 the responses described above (@samp{I LOVE YOU}, etc.).
 
@@ -563,7 +563,7 @@
 Response expected: yes.
 Notify the server of the command that we are leading up to.  Intended to allow
 the server to send a redirect for write operations.  Requires either an
address@hidden or @code{Redirect} respnose.
address@hidden or @code{Redirect} response.
 
 @item Referrer @var{CVSROOT} \n
 Response expected: no.
@@ -593,7 +593,7 @@
 @code{Entry} or @code{Modified}, and then a final @code{Directory}
 for the original directory, then the command.
 The @var{local-directory} is relative to
-the top level at which the command is occurring (i.e. the last
+the top level at which the command is occurring (i.e., the last
 @code{Directory} which is sent before the command);
 to indicate that top level, @samp{.} should be sent for
 @var{local-directory}.
@@ -988,7 +988,7 @@
 situations where the user specifies a filename and the client does not
 know about that file).
 
-Though this request will be supported into the forseeable future, it has been
+Though this request will be supported into the foreseeable future, it has been
 the source of numerous bug reports in the past due to the complexity of testing
 this functionality via the test suite and client developers are encouraged not
 to use it.  Instead, please consider munging conflicting names and maintaining
@@ -1266,7 +1266,7 @@
 @code{Directory} request is ignored (it merely must point somewhere
 within the root).  The files to be imported are sent in @code{Modified}
 requests (files which the client knows should be ignored are not sent;
-the server must still process the CVSROOT/cvsignore file unless -I ! is
+the server must still process the CVSROOT/cvsignore file unless -I !@: is
 sent).  A log message must have been specified with a @code{-m}
 argument.
 
@@ -1383,7 +1383,7 @@
 taken place and update the history file accordingly.
 
 @item global-list-quiet \n
-Response expected: yes.  This request is a synonym for noop, but its existance
+Response expected: yes.  This request is a synonym for noop, but its existence
 notifies the client that a @code{-q} option to @code{list} and @code{rlist}
 will be rejected.  This, in a reverse-logic sort of way, is here so that when
 it @emph{isn't} received, as for instance from CVSNT, the client will know that
@@ -1459,7 +1459,7 @@
 @c lame terms (mostly because they are so awkward).  Any better ideas?
 The responses @code{Checked-in}, @code{New-entry}, @code{Updated},
 @code{Created}, @code{Update-existing}, @code{Merged}, and
address@hidden are refered to as @dfn{file updating} responses, because
address@hidden are referred to as @dfn{file updating} responses, because
 they change the status of a file in the working directory in some way.
 The responses @code{Mode}, @code{Mod-time}, and @code{Checksum} are
 referred to as @dfn{file update modifying} responses because they modify
@@ -1478,7 +1478,7 @@
 @c end in "/.".
 The name is somewhat misleading; it actually indicates a pair of
 pathnames.  First, a local directory name
-relative to the directory in which the command was given (i.e. the last
+relative to the directory in which the command was given (i.e., the last
 @code{Directory} before the command).  Then a linefeed and a repository
 name.  Then a slash and the filename (without a @samp{,v} ending).
 
@@ -1557,7 +1557,7 @@
 
 @item Checked-in @var{pathname} \n
 Additional data: New Entries line, \n.  This means a file @var{pathname}
-has been successfully operated on (checked in, added, etc.).  name in
+has been successfully operated on (checked in, added, etc.).  The name in
 the Entries line is the same as the last component of @var{pathname}.
 
 @item New-entry @var{pathname} \n
@@ -1928,7 +1928,7 @@
 first, for error checking purposes, is @samp{y} if @var{pathname} is expected
 to exist, @samp{n} if @var{pathname} is not expected to exist, and
 @samp{m} if @var{pathname} might exist.  The second character must be @samp{y}
-if the new @var{pathanme} should be writable and @samp{n}, otherwise.  When
+if the new @var{pathname} should be writable and @samp{n}, otherwise.  When
 a temp file is used, it may be deleted and forgotten afterwards.
 
 @item Base-merge @var{pathname} \n
@@ -2040,7 +2040,7 @@
 @c line breaks.  Any better solutions?
 @c Other than that, this exchange is taken verbatim from the data
 @c exchanged by CVS (as of Nov 1996).  That is why some of the requests and
address@hidden reponses are not quite what you would pick for pedagogical 
purposes.
address@hidden responses are not quite what you would pick for pedagogical 
purposes.
 
 @example
 C: Root /u/cvsroot
@@ -2212,7 +2212,7 @@
 
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
-The @code{Modified} request could be speeded up by sending diffs rather
+The @code{Modified} request could be sped up by sending diffs rather
 than entire files.  The client would need some way to keep the version
 of the file which was originally checked out; probably requiring the use
 of "cvs edit" in this case is the most sensible course (the "cvs edit"




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